Dunwich Dynamo - ride report

19 July 2016, 14:35

The Dunwich Dynamo is not a race. Nor is it a sportive. Nor is it organised (by anyone!). The Dunwich Dynamo is a rite of passage – an annual 120 mile bike ride from London Fields in east London to Dunwich, on the Suffolk coast. It’s been going for over 20 years and the route is just “known”, and the date is the Saturday closest to the full moon in July. Riders set off sometime between 7 and 9pm, and generally don’t make it to the beach at Dunwich until sunrise, or some hours thereafter.

James is the cyclist in our relationship (I prefer to think of myself as “a runner who’s sometimes on a bike”) and I urged him to ride it last year as I think it’s good to challenge yourself and go outside your comfort zone every now and then. He absolutely loved the experience and camaraderie on the road through the night, and assured me that there’s plenty of slower riders, riders on Bromptons, wacky races-style antics, and plenty of burger vans and pubs open all night along the way, and that he really thought I could do it. So I agreed, as long it the forecast wasn’t really wet (as it turned out, it was super warm and just about perfect!).

Dunwich Dynamo
selfie at the start

I’ve been cycle commuting regularly since January when we moved moorings, but my route is only 11km each way, and my longest ride ever is still just some 30 mile sportives we did last year. But I figured I’d just take it at my own pace, and well, it’d be good to challenge myself a bit. I should also probably point out that I do all my cycling on a 25 year old, heavy ass (14kg) mountain bike with road tires, and that I haven’t worn my clippy shoes in nearly a year either. But I’ve got marathon running legs and good cardio, so I figured the flat-ish route shouldn’t be too big of an issue. What worried me much more was the overnight aspect, as I start nodding off every night at 11pm on the dot – I pretty much wind down like a clockwork toy. And I was right to worry, as fighting sleep deprivation was by far the hardest part about the Dynamo for me.

We set off at London Fields in a big group of riders around 8pm, and the streets through London were quite fun – really congested with cyclists but good banter and there were just SO many of us that drivers just gave us the right of way, which was great. Things spread out a bit once we got to Waltham Forest, and by the time we got to the first pub stop I was feeling hungry, but otherwise fine. I resisted the siren call of a chandy and had some bar snacks and some flapjacks instead.

Dunwich Dynamo
at the first pub, around 10pm, with tea!

It’s probably a good point now to list out a few things I liked about the ride, and a few things I didn’t.

Things I liked

  • The pit stops were great – full of happy people, food, chatter, and friendly support. These each felt like a mini festival!
  • The inventive light displays – loads of riders decorated their bikes and helmets with fairy lights, and a good amount had the wheel LED displays, too, which made it feel really festive.
  • The Sudbury Fire Station halfway point – a true beacon in the darkness and my own personal Mile21 moment!
  • Especially in the second half, the country lanes were utterly gorgeous. Early in the morning, there was hardly any traffic, so you could just concentrate on the views and fresh air
  • The people who set up chairs in their front gardens just to wave and cheer us on. I made sure to give them a toot and a wave in return!
  • Spending time with my husband in a shared pursuit. He doesn’t run, so this was a great way for us to do an athletic activity together.
  • Dunwich beach and a dip in the sea – best ice bath EVER.

Dunwich Dynamo
Dawn at Barking

Things I didn’t like

  • The overnight aspect. Losing a night’s sleep was far, far harder than the ride itself. It would’ve been 100% more enjoyable for me if it was an 8am-8pm ride.
  • Being passed by thousands of riders, over and over again, for hours on end. I’m not a particularly slow cyclist, but I’d be going at a fair clip and then be passed by a group of riders like I was standing still. It’s really dispiriting to be passed like that over and over again, and it means you can’t chat to anyone, either. I wished there was a dedicated social/casual wave to allow more camraderie outside the pit stops.
  • Descents with blind corners in the dark. I cannot stress how much these stress me out. I don’t mind descents when I can see what’s coming up, but if I can’t see the road surface, or if there are any riders or cars ahead of me, I’m going to lay on that brake like a freaking granny so I don’t end up with full body road rash.
  • The asshole who shouted at me while on a dark descent just before dawn, while passing really closely, causing me to fucking lose my last remaining nerve and burst into tears, requiring 15 minutes of hugs and chocolate by the roadside before continuing. Fuck you, mister man in backpack. I hope you feel big and proud.

Despite having not cycled anything longer than an hour in the past year and not having trained at all, my legs and lungs were actually fine throughout. My right hip started bothering me and my bum started chafing a bit after about 80 miles, and I was fighting low-level nausea for the second half, but I think I held up okay, all considering.

Dunwich Dynamo
Pancake & Gu pick-me-up…

Despite all the unenjoyable bits, I’m still really glad I did this. I’m proud that I was able to cycle for 9.5hrs (12.5 hrs elapsed time) with relatively few consequences. I’m proud that I didn’t fall over in my clippy shoes, not even once. I’m proud that I didn’t walk up any of the hills, even at the end when lots of others were doing so. And I’m proud that I did it in entirely self-sewn gear, too (more on this over at fehrtrade.com).

Dunwich Dynamo
Obligatory finish photo!

I feel the need to give a special shout out to two people who really and truly got me through this when I might not have otherwise. First, my Run dem Crew friend Vicky, who not only stayed up all night at Sudbury Fire Station to cheer me and a handful of other RDC friends on, but she also made trays and trays of sandwiches, cakes, orange slices, crisps, and even gluten free options and really helped boost morale when I felt about 90% done at the halfway point. And second, my husband James, without whom I really don’t know whether I’d have finished. He stayed with me the entire ride, picked me up when I needed it, hugged me when I needed it, got food and drinks while I stayed with the bikes, and brought some magic chocolate and pancakes from his bag at exactly the right point (pancakes topped with salted caramel Gu gels is a wonderful thing, btw). Basically, he sacrificed his ride so that I could get through it.

Dunwich Dynamo
Beach finish. Thank god!

I really do think it’s something that everyone who’s able should experience at least once, and I’m glad I did it. But right now I don’t think I feel the need to do it again!

Dunwich Dynamo, 16-17 July. 9:33:29

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Comments:

  1. Amazing, amazing job! I share your feelings about descents (I don’t like going fast downhill unless the road is in good nick and dead straight!) and being overtaken – I struggle a bit with this with our local cycling club and getting “dropped” on rides and hills. Don’t let it get you down. Given you’re not a cyclist you did phenomenally and that completed time is something to be proud of!


    Arianne    19 July 2016, 20:29    #
  2. Oh man! I so hear you on the bad pass leading to 15 minutes of crying—almost exactly the same thing happened to me when training for my first big ride, on a narrow highway with no bike lane. But you kept going and finished—hurray! Also, big respect for the overnight aspect: I would never even start such a thing, old lady that I am! :-)


    Rebecca    20 July 2016, 05:03    #

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